Enoteca – Fine Wine & Beer

Connecting Post Falls, Coeur d' Alene, Spokane and surrounding towns with high quality beverages. Wine and Beer of the Month Clubs, wine & beer tasting events, and huge selection

Monday-Saturday open at 11am. Close at last customer. Are we still here? Call 208-457-9885. Now Open Sunday 3-8pm, full bar service!

Refund Policy

Posted by Enoteca Fine Wine & Beer

Enoteca Staff strives to recommend wine & beer products that fit your needs, but as with any food product, taste is personal and an exchange cannot be made on the basis of taste. Wine & beer are also agricultural products, and as with any such product, variation from bottle to bottle or vintage to vintage cannot be the basis of an exchange.

How do I know if my bottle of wine suffers from cork taint?

The only returnable and exchangeable bottles are those which are bad by way of cork taint. Here are some guidelines for determining if this is the case with your bottle. All decisions for returns and exchanges are the sole discretion of Enoteca Staff.

The chief cause of cork taint is the presence of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) in the wine. Corked wine containing TCA has a characteristic odor, variously described as resembling a moldy newspaper, wet dog, or damp basement. In almost all cases of corked wine the wine’s native aromas are reduced significantly, and a very tainted wine is completely undrinkable (though harmless).

Typical Wine Faults

Fault Description How to Detect
Cork taint Dull or moldy odor
Oxidation Advanced coloring, dull aroma, sherry-like
Volatile acidity Vinegar, glue, nail polish remover
Sulfur dioxide Burnt match odor
Hydrogen sulfide Rotten egg odor
Mercaptan Cauliflower, garlic, onion or rubber odor
Acrolein Acrid, butter taste
Metal/Protein haze Hazy appearance
Clorophenol Antiseptic, medicinal, disinfectant, paint, phenolic, plastic odor
Cardboard odor Cardboard odor
Unripe grapes Excessive vegetal aroma and taste, astringent
Rotten grapes Advanced coloring, musty odor